Visit the Outer Banks Labor Day Weekend This Year

The Outer Banks happen to be one of the hottest locations for you and your family to enjoy Labor Day Weekend this year. The kids will be headed back to school soon and what a better way to end the summer than a vacation to the Outer Banks. Staying in one of our Kill Devil Hills vacation rentals will keep you where the action is happening. Let’s look at what there is going on during Labor Day weekend below.

Kids Day in the Park

Want something for the kids to have fun with bouncy houses, activities and even a special tour of Whalehead. The Joan’s Way Tour will begin at 3:00 pm and costs $5 per person. Please note that the tour does have a limit of 30 children so please reserve your spot in advance. On August 30 head to the Historic Corolla Park and begins 10:00 am and ends at 4:00 pm. Come and join in on the fun happening here.

Meet a Mustang

Have someone in your family that likes horses, then head over to the Corolla Wild Horse Museum to meet a mustang. On Friday, August 31st at 10:00 am to 1:00 pm, come meet a rescued mustang and learn about the history of the wild Colonial Spanish mustangs. This is a free event for you and your family to enjoy. Please note that the event is weather dependent so please call ahead on the day of the even to make sure it’s still happening. What a better way to learn more about the wild horses of the Outer Banks.

Blacksmithing at Island Farm

The Outer Banks have so much history to share with its visitors, and this event is one you can’t miss out on. Head over to Island Farm located in Manteo where you can see examples of what Hugh Gaylor had in his blacksmith shop in 1850. There is so much to do at this farm that dates back to 1847. Only 15 minutes from Nags Head and is close to Fort Raleigh for more adventures. Admission is $5 per person and children 5 and younger are free. Be sure to check out their website for more information. What a great way to learn about the heritage of North Carolina than to be with family!

WRV Outer Banks Pro Surf Contest

The WRV Outer Banks Pro Surf Contest happens to be known as one of the most anticipated surf contests in the State. This is a thrill for both the participants and for the spectators to watch each year. Located in Nags Head, NC you will be able to view some of the world’s most talented riders competing for the title of OBX Champ! Beginning on Wednesday, August 29th and ending on Monday, September 3 you will be able to enjoy some of this amazing talent of surfing. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to see some pro surfers in the waves of North Carolina!

Seaside Hike

What a better way than to head over to Jockey’s Ridge State Park and enjoy some fun there. On August 31st join the staff at the state park to hike the Soundside Nature Trail. You will discuss interesting habitats that live along the barrier islands. This is a free event for you and your family to take advantage of while on vacation. The hike will begin at 9:00 am so be sure to be there a few minutes early to join in on the fun.

While there are many other events happening on the Outer Banks over Labor Day weekend, these are just a few we’d share with you. If you are still hunting for a last-minute Nags Head or Kill Devil Hills vacation rental, we can help you today. We look forward to seeing you this Labor Day weekend to help end the summer out right!

 

Outer Banks National Scenic Byway

Outer Banks National Scenic Byway

Take the road less traveled. Take the time to experience the actuality of North Carolinas Easternmost parts along the coast of the state’s barrier islands. Currently the Outer Banks National Scenic Byway is made up of nine barrier islands – or banks. The islands protect the mainland coast from the Atlantic Ocean’s, at times, compelling winds and water.

The length of the secluded road is 142.5 driving miles.

The driving time is 6.5 hours – including 3.5 hours on two ferries.

The byway begins in the Outer Banks region and ends in the Crystal Coast region. The Outer Banks National Scenic Byway passes through one of the nation’s great coastal landscapes, tidal marshes, wind-swept dunes, and alluring sounds border the roadway. The byway also includes two national seashores, Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout. There is two national wildlife refuges – Pea Island and Cedar Island. The barrier islands are separated away from the mainland by six different sounds ranging from three to 40 miles wide. From North to South they are: Currituck, Albemarle, Roanoke, Pamlico, Core and Bogue.

       

The oceangoing culture of the 21 coastal villages along the road is what makes this route so unique. Each maritime village shares a common cultural heritage which is shaped by the well know barrier islands and three shallow sounds – Pamlico, Core and Back. During the drive visitors will notice that the tiny villages are held together by locally owned businesses with barley a chain business in sight.   The residents of these villages build boats, fish and hunt, operate ferries, guard the coast, tell stories and provide services to visitors. Fishing and hunting as livelihoods are keys to this culture that goes along with living on the coastal edge. Byway villages are held to a significant national history, a collection of the nation’s earliest civil works. This includes four historic lighthouses and eight early U.S. Life-Saving Service or U.S. Coast Guard stations. The four lighthouses along the byway are Bodie Island Lighthouse, Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Ocracoke Village Lighthouse, and Cape Lookout National Seashore Lighthouse.

Take the drive on The Outer Banks National Scenic Byway and get a feel for how life was like before the hectic schedules and tourist-driven cities. The Outer Banks National Scenic Byway begins in the north at Whalebone Junction. The joining of US 64-264, US 158, and NC 12 in Nags Head, Dare County, North Carolina. Travelers following the Byway’s NC 12 south can see the Atlantic Ocean on the east and the Pamlico Sound on the west. The road crosses over Bodie and Hatteras islands in Dare County, Ocracoke Island in Hyde County and Down East in Carteret County to end on the west side of North River at the intersection of US 70 and Merrimon Road. The byway includes two ferry rides. One free, between Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands. The other, between Ocracoke Island and Downs Easts Cedar Island. The Scenic Byway ends in Beaufort in the Down East region of North Carolina.

http://www.visitnc.com/trip-idea/outer-banks-national-scenic-byway-1

http://gardenandgun.com/blog/back-road-trip-outer-banks-scenic-byway

New findings on The Roanoke Island Missing Colony

New findings on The Roanoke Island Missing Colony

One of the first few thoughts that come to mind when you think of the Outer Banks includes Roanoke Islands Lost Colony. Chances are if you have ever visited Manteo or the OBX in general, then you have seen the outdoor drama The Lost Colony produced by the Roanoke Island Historical Association. This is a non-profit association created to help celebrate the history of the first English colonies on Roanoke Island, North Carolina. The play is was generated to honor the founders of The Lost Colony through drama, education, and literature.

For those of you that don’t know the story about the disappearance of The Lost Colony, let’s bring you back to the 16th-century. In July of 1587, 117 English men, women, and children came ashore on Roanoke Island with a commission from Elizabeth I to establish a permanent English settlement in the New World. An Englishmen named John White helped lead the settlers to Roanoke Island, which is located inside the chain of barrier islands that is today called the Outer Banks. It was Sir Walter Raleigh’s second attempt to colonize North Carolina, but the first to include civilians and families. White’s granddaughter, Virginia Dare was the first child born in the New World to English parents just weeks after their arrival. A resupply trip sent White back to England that same year. A naval war with Spain delayed his return. Three years later in 1590, when English ships returned to bring back supplies, the settlers had vanished. The only clue left behind was the word “Croatoan” carved into a fence post, and the letters “CRO” on a tree. Many believe these referred to what is now Hatteras Island, 50 miles south of their settlement.

On and off for the past three years, Nicholas M. Luccketti and his archaeology team have been working along the coast of the Albemarle Sound trying to uncover more clues on this mystery. Mr. Luccketti and colleagues with the First Colony Foundation have been digging up parts of the shores and hillsides of the Albemarle Sound hoping to find traces of the colonists. The dig site where they have been working is located in a secluded cove off of a creek in Merry Hill N.C., they call the spot Site X. The archaeologists have not found evidence of structures there, but have found ceramics and other material of European origin that might have come from Roanoke colonists. In an article posted by The New York Times Luccketti says “I’m trying to make sure that I say this correctly. We have evidence from this site that strongly indicates that there were Roanoke colonists here.”

New findings means more questions and more excitement. Some scholars who have seen the evidence are supportive of the findings, but at least one sees the evidence as not enough to draw solid conclusions. All agree more digging is needed in order to determine the findings at Site X. The latest findings include fragments of earthenware and pottery, a mashed metal rivet, and a piece of a hand-wrought nail. All were found in a shallow pit on a hillside above the Albemarle Sound.

In 2012 was when the most alluring clue was brought to attention by the British Museum when they re-examined one of White’s coastal maps for the First Colony Foundation. X-ray spectroscopy and other imaging techniques revealed that a patch hid a four-pointed blur and red star on the western end of Albemarle Sound.  That certain spot, near the outlets of the Chowan River and Salmon Creek, more or less corresponded to White’s reference to a site 50 miles inland, Croatoan (now Hatteras Island). Eric Klingelhofer, a vice president for research at the foundation and a history professor at Mercer University in Macon, GA says “We need to know more. This whole story is a blank page, a blank chapter of history, and I think archaeology is the only way to come up with answers.”

If you would like to read more about the new findings of the Roanoke Island Colony check out this article the New York Times posted.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/11/science/the-roanoke-colonists-lost-and-found.html?_r=0

Book Early And Save in January

There is little more than a week left to Book Early and Save on participating properties for the 2015 season! Simply book and confirm by making your first payment by January 31st to receive the discount.

Remember, our phone lines and Live Chat are open till 8pm EST weekdays & 5:30pm EST on weekends.

Call: 800-338-3233 or email info@outerbanksrentals.com  info@outerbanksrentals.com

 

The Duck Waterfront Boardwalk

When you think of a ‘boardwalk,’ Atlantic City, Virginia Beach, & Myrtle Beach all come to mind. But did you know Duck, NC has a 4,149 square foot Sound Side boardwalk, spanning from Aqua Restaurant and Spa all the way to the Duck Waterfront Shops. There is even a Kitty Hawk Kites location on the boardwalk where you get discounts as a Stan White guest!

The Duck Town Park is a premier community recreational facility featuring 11 acres of natural beauty including trails through the Maritime Forest and willow swamp, open green space, soundside views, and access to the Town’s boardwalk.

Waterfront Shops:

Park Amenities:

  • soundside boardwalk
  • amphitheater
  • public kayak/canoe launch
  • four-slip, transient use boat pier at the northern end of the boardwalk
  • picnic shelter
  • playground
  • gazebo
  • water fountains, including a special one for our canine friends
  • walking trails throughout the park
  • summer events for everyone to enjoy annual Jazz Festival on the Sunday of Columbus Day weekend

Video Source: TownofDuck.com

*Original Photography unless source given

Live Traffic Cameras in the OBX

Any one who has braved the Bypass (US158) or the Beach Road (NC12) during the summer months knows all to well that traffic on the Outer Banks is highly unpredictable. The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) has live traffic cameras and speed detectors online to make the easy life easier! This year, 2 new cameras have been installed at the Hatteras/Ocracoke ferry docks. These new additions will help keep travelers and locals informed 24 hours a day.

All the cameras in the area can be seen here.

Our New Property Manager to Corolla Office

We reopened our Corolla office last month under a new property manager, Kristina Cifers. Cifers, with over ten years of real estate experience, will be in charge of all operations at Stan White Realty’s office in Corolla. “I am known for my realistic prowess, market knowledge and results-driven approach, and it shows when I bring my client’s vision to existence,” said Cifers. Cifers is a resident of the Outer Banks and has a strong sales background. “After months of searching, it is my pleasure to welcome Cifers to the SWR&C team. Her passion for helping others and ambition to succeed make her an ideal leader to grow and sustain our current effort to provide better value and accessibility to the Corolla area,” said John White, CEO.
Kristina Cifers, NC Realtor 
Kristina Cifers, NC Realtor